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Akunin

What pays the bills?

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Work in the steel industry,we make steel pipe,1/2”-4”.Been here 42 years. My current position is unloading trucks that deliver steel coils,also I supply the slitter with all the coils they run. Most days are pretty busy. 

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I might have used some of that pipe years ago when in the patch.

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i miss days of hauling hay, grain, equipment, and silage ... even hauled wood chips and sand for a friend who had horses ... he's also closed down... the 1st  pic .. a long nose Pete b model (all mechinical) (500 horse +) cat ... i never did find out what the top speed was ...  i started out with cab over transtar big cam cummins looked exactly like this one...  

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Network Administrator for K-12 school district.

or the computer guy as the kindergarten kids say. Smaller district only 1200 kids 

appx,. 1000 chrome books and 400 desktop computers.

 

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IT at a healthcare facility , scrap metal enthusiast lol,  and i fix computers on the side. Whatever i can make money on i try xD

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I am a diesel engine technician, currently employed with Peterbilt Trucks as a Paccar engine specialist. 

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45 minutes ago, Dredd said:

I am a diesel engine technician, currently employed with Peterbilt Trucks as a Paccar engine specialist. 

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So small engine technician?  LOL

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Lol. I've worked on some ridiculous equipment, including Cat 797 400 TON haul trucks, 65 ton scoop hydraulic shovels, and the largest dozens and graders in the world. All while I was up in the Alberta oilsands. I also spent 3 years working for a Hydraulic Fracturing company, working on 3000HP fracturing equipment. It's a wild world out there. Lol. These pics were of when I worked for a equipment moving company, the trailer in this picture is rated at 120 Ton, the d11 with no blade this unit is well over 200 tonnes. With the push truck attached, this unit was over 200ft long. 

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1 hour ago, Dredd said:

Lol. I've worked on some ridiculous equipment, including Cat 797 400 TON haul trucks, 65 ton scoop hydraulic shovels, and the largest dozens and graders in the world. All while I was up in the Alberta oilsands. I also spent 3 years working for a Hydraulic Fracturing company, working on 3000HP fracturing equipment. It's a wild world out there. Lol. These pics were of when I worked for a equipment moving company, the trailer in this picture is rated at 120 Ton, the d11 with no blade this unit is well over 200 tonnes. With the push truck attached, this unit was over 200ft long. 

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how does a 120 ton trailer haul a 200 ton dozer ?..lol.

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My regular job. I am a Jigalow. I Women pay me to wine , dine and shine them up.  With Corona work is slow. So I am repairing heavy equipment.  ——- how many hp on that dozer. 

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Retired Power Lineman,then worked Rv Parks for 7 yrs traveling around.Now I'm retired for a while.

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Shade the trailer unit consists of 112 wheels from to back, every axle having a manual controlled air bag suspension. Tri drive truck, 24 wheel jeep(2 when the roads are restricted), 24 wheel trailer, 24 wheel booster, plus another 10 on the push truck. Basically what I learned during this job is the more wheels you have on the ground distributing the weight, along with the manual air suspension, you can haul some amazing weight. As you adjust each axle, the weight on the other axles changes, so it takes some work to get the load distributed right. Once the load is balanced, you lock the suspension in place.  Each wheel set has a certain weight it can not exceed. Every load they made, they were overweight, over height and over width. 4 pilot trucks included with the load. They were charging Suncor $32,000 per trip, which was about 10-12 hours. When I first started they were making 3 trips a week. 

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On a side note, this is a true story, I followed the empty trailer back to Ft Mac one night , after rescuing it off the side of the road, truck pulling was a Kenworth with a 750hp deleted c15. I was in a 5500 dodge service truck, and I could not keep up with the driver. When we checked the GPS on thst truck, speeds of over 145km/h were recorded. He was fired shortly thereafter. Lol

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retired farmer / rancher  .... raised cattle, row crops, tobacco ,  and truck driver, firefighter / heavy rescue , and got very skilled at wrenching on all of my own equipment .... now just investments in land ... and other things ... and being board ..... lol! 

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HP on that dozer is in the 850-900 HP range, it is the biggest Cat makes (d11)

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oh! my new venture ?? Wilson's tree service ... it's one man operation ...  but could have been two ...  but a friend backed out because of a short road trip WEST ... LOL 

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1 hour ago, Fishfiles said:

Tier 4 / DEF ?   

No thank goodness. That pic was taken in 2012 or 13,And at that time the dozer had 30,000 hours because it was going for a rebuild. I have taken several Cummins aftertreatment courses, I keep having to upgrade it to keep up with the new systems. Aftertreatment systems make up for about 50% I would guess of the work that I do. 

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retired state law enforcement officer. now I am helping at a friends mechanic shop with the small simple stuff.

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Toyota payed my bills for the last 27 years. Tech. I have been off work since last September on disability. I got Cancer. I am doing good now. Hope to go back to work in the near future.

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lets try this on the right thread.

 


I am no farmer but would think weather and tobacco go together like peas and carrots ----   You need the proper weather for a good harvest !!!! 


 
At 5 - 25 cents per pound , forget tobacco ...  Now days weed is the cash crop ,  couple to a few grand a pound ----  LOL


 

 

no no.... I'm talking lbs of quota .... (what your allowed to raise on your farm) not the actual price of each  pound of a bale ...... although ... you could purchase lbs .... so you were allowed to raise more.... but when the price on quota went up...from 5 cents all the way to 25+ cents,  farmers stopped raising it ... due to the fact  we couldn't make hardly any money after paying labor, fuel etc.....and ...actually tobaco needs a good wet root start, then just mostly dry hot weather .... and a rain every now and again, too much water ... would cause mold, or root rot, which would spread among plants.

 

Quote

The price of tobacco was raised above the market level to the “support price” by restricting production through the use of (edited)-assigned producer poundage quotas. The national tobacco-marketing quota was the quantity (in pounds) of tobacco all domestic producers were permitted to market each year. 1 The national quota was allocated among individual farms based proportionally on their history of producing tobacco. The federal (edited) each year adjusted the amount of quotas based ...

Edited by _Wilson_™

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