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MargeShrimpson

Unusual tire leaks

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Posted (edited)

A lot going on here so lets go point-by-point...

 

12 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

oh yeah.... that would be a great mix .... talk about a rim being eat up....

 

I bet Sta-Flo does eat a rim but slime does not. I have had too much in too many different rims. The new stuff is anti-corrosive if anything.

 

12 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

nah i wouldn't think all those guys using his method would still be going the rout if it has a tendency to freeze

 

They are sand duners... they ride in the desert primarily. Freezing isn't on their radars either I would guess.

The first ingredient is water... it will freeze.

 

12 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

and I've had green slime freeze before

 

If you were using the blue off-road kind and it was the new stuff you must have had some harsh winters going on over there lol

 

From Slime...

 

Quote

"With a low freezing point of -35˚F (-37˚C) and a high separation point of 182˚F (82˚C), our sealants will remain effective under the most extreme temperatures."

 

I would guess that what you experienced was not "frozen" but had solidified a bit due to being cold.

Mine all do that but it works out with a short ride and does not affect performance. I don't see true cold like the Yoopers and the Canadians though...

We ride and haul wood in the dead of winter though so I do have experience with what we call cold anyway.

 

12 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

pepper will not seal a tire ... not even fine ground up ... pepper .. there's not enough tire pressure to make that work

 

That is an old-school trick for sealing things and would absolutely work in this context. Quick google to see validation. "pepper seal tire"

Course ground pepper would work with Sta-Flo as a filler no doubt. I have done the pepper in coolant system back in the dumb teenager days. It works.

 

Why is Sta-Flo an awesome solution? It's temporary.

You may only need a day of riding out of that old set of tires. Maybe a few days worth while you wait on the new ones.

 

I will use it as a non-permeant and cheap solution to flats instead of spending the extra money on Slime.

 

Capture.PNG

Edited by oh400ex

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13 hours ago, oh400ex said:

Edit: We could take all of our expeances and make and eco-friendly slime... @LedFTed with the black pepper and @SlammedRanger with the sta-flo... now all we need is a "green" anti-freeze and we caught the golden goose lol

 

I go to make a joke and now I'm sitting here looking at items in an Amazon cart... 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Vegetable-Glycerine-Glycerin-Natural-Cosmetic/dp/B06XXHXRND

https://www.amazon.com/Argo-100-Pure-Corn-Starch/dp/B00JPT9BFW

https://www.amazon.com/1-Pound-Premium-Barbeque-Grilling-Seasoning/dp/B00KZ167T2

 

Going to try this at some point. I can't help myself lol.

Wheeler and Fish have to mod things and I have to do stuff like this 🤣

You could eat this mix and it may be anti-corrosive for metal...

 

I'm just saying when you can buy eco-friendly slime and it's made from VG, black pepper and corn starch... me, ted and slammed are coming for our checks lol

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1 hour ago, oh400ex said:

 

A lot going on here so lets go point-by-point...

 

14 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

oh yeah.... that would be a great mix .... talk about a rim being eat up....

 

I bet Sta-Flo does eat a rim but slime does not. I have had too much in too many different rims. The new stuff is anti-corrosive if anything.

 

could .... i don't know as, I've never used stayflo .... but slime will.... i al reckon  it depends on the type of paint the inside of the steel rim is shot with ? have take all the issues  into consideration ... and slammed has never told me wrong, or anyone for that matter ... 

 

Quote
14 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

nah i wouldn't think all those guys using his method would still be going the rout if it has a tendency to freeze

 

They are sand duners... they ride in the desert primarily. Freezing isn't on their radars either I would guess.

The first ingredient is water... it will freeze.

 

i would think with tire heat ... it would thaw (if frozen) .. and work just fine ??... over here tires do have a habit of becoming very stiff ... in ultra cold temps....  that's just how it is ... 

 

Quote

 

14 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

and I've had green slime freeze before

 

If you were using the blue off-road kind and it was the new stuff you must have had some harsh winters going on over there lol

 

From Slime...

 

I've  had it freeze out right .. on my 2000 300... also on the 97 ... maybe a bad mix .... i couldn't say... but it did freeze solid ... and no other additives were added .. 

 

 

Quote

 

Quote

"With a low freezing point of -35˚F (-37˚C) and a high separation point of 182˚F (82˚C), our sealants will remain effective under the most extreme temperatures."

 

I would guess that what you experienced was not "frozen" but had solidified a bit due to being cold.

Mine all do that but it works out with a short ride and does not affect performance. I don't see true cold like the Yoopers and the Canadians though...

We ride and haul wood in the dead of winter though so I do have experience with what we call cold anyway.

 

14 hours ago, _Wilson_™ said:

pepper will not seal a tire ... not even fine ground up ... pepper .. there's not enough tire pressure to make that work

 

That is an old-school trick for sealing things and would absolutely work in this context. Quick google to see validation. "pepper seal tire"

Course ground pepper would work with Sta-Flo as a filler no doubt. I have done the pepper in coolant system back in the dumb teenager days. It works.

 

ive seen / heard of people using pepper in engine radiators, also raw eggs ... lol ... just a cheep temp stupid fix IMO ... and not a very smart idea .... if you ever delt with engines that have a thermostat with a jiggle valve ... pepper would stop that up right off... 

 

 

Quote

Why is Sta-Flo an awesome solution? It's temporary.

You may only need a day of riding out of that old set of tires. Maybe a few days worth while you wait on the new ones.

 

I will use it as a non-permeant and cheap solution to flats instead of spending the extra money on Slime.

 

Capture.PNG

Edited 1 hour ago by oh400ex

 

 

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i've heard of mustard in radiators stopping leaks..never tried it though ?..lol. years ago, i had a leak in a 350 block, bought some stuff maid by prestone , it came in a clear small bottle, had pellets in it, poured it in the radiator, no more leaks, not sure if it's still around today ?. 

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Stay flo from what all those guys on what ever forum that was said there is absolutely no harm done to the rims. They had claimed to have been doing this trick for 10+ years and gone through many tires and rims. So they have tried it on all different materials rims are made out of. They also said there isnt any liquid left in the tires. It finds the gap. Fills it. Hardens. And the rest turns into a white residue. These guys all said that is why they like it more than slime. Zero mess when changing tires. It is far from a temporary fix. They all said they put it in on every single tire they change to. No matter what. Not just if there is a leak. But they all said slow seeping of tires is 100% a thing of the past. Keep in mind they pretty much all run beadlocks. And so do i. But there were a few guys on that forum that do not and said it worked just the same. I have not seen this part first hand. But for a gamble of 4 bucks to try it i cant see how you could go wrong. Aside from maybe doing it way up north in the middle of winter. As it is obveously water based and will freeze no doubt. But do it in the summer and you wont need to do it again in the cold. Like i said there wont be any liquid left when the gap is found and sealed.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, SlammedRanger said:

Stay flo from what all those guys on what ever forum that was said there is absolutely no harm done to the rims. They had claimed to have been doing this trick for 10+ years and gone through many tires and rims. So they have tried it on all different materials rims are made out of. They also said there isnt any liquid left in the tires. It finds the gap. Fills it. Hardens. And the rest turns into a white residue. These guys all said that is why they like it more than slime. Zero mess when changing tires. It is far from a temporary fix. They all said they put it in on every single tire they change to. No matter what. Not just if there is a leak. But they all said slow seeping of tires is 100% a thing of the past. Keep in mind they pretty much all run beadlocks. And so do i. But there were a few guys on that forum that do not and said it worked just the same. I have not seen this part first hand. But for a gamble of 4 bucks to try it i cant see how you could go wrong. Aside from maybe doing it way up north in the middle of winter. As it is obveously water based and will freeze no doubt. But do it in the summer and you wont need to do it again in the cold. Like i said there wont be any liquid left when the gap is found and sealed.

 

I'm curious how it plays with my steel rims. I can only see it rusting. Water as main ingredient and no anti-corrosion ingredients (that I know of) so I don't know how it wouldn't.

Most rims are aluminum on performance machines and I would bet there is no issue there. I am also wondering how the fill the crack, harden and flake deal would work... I can imagine the rubber flexing causing the hardened starch to break out its bond. People wouldn't use it if it did nothing but I don't understand how it could do both filling and drying. Maybe it is a one-time fill on use compared to slime that can fill new holes later? We are going to find out. I will be buying a kit next time I'm in town and have plenty of tires to try it on. 

 

Edit: Oh and temporary as in "it is easy to remove unlike slime" but not temporary fix is a great point and part of what I was trying to say

Edited by oh400ex

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12 minutes ago, oh400ex said:

 

I'm curious how it plays with my steel rims. I can only see it rusting. Water as main ingredient and no anti-corrosion ingredients (that I know of) so I don't know how it wouldn't.

Most rims are aluminum on performance machines and I would bet there is no issue there. I am also wondering how the fill the crack, harden and flake deal would work... I can imagine the rubber flexing causing the hardened starch to break out its bond. People wouldn't use it if it did nothing but I don't understand how it could do both filling and drying. Maybe it is a one-time fill on use compared to slime that can fill new holes later? We are going to find out. I will be buying a kit next time I'm in town and have plenty of tires to try it on. 

 

Edit: Oh and temporary as in "it is easy to remove unlike slime" but not temporary fix is a great point and part of what I was trying to say

What i think is it will just dry up and not rust the rim. If it was a liquid rolling around in the tire it could and would rust a steel rim for sure. But i think you are right where it is just a spot fix. Not saving a tire from a puncture down the road like slime claims to do. I personally have never had slime do anything for me but cause a headache when dismounting tires. I did use it years ago and the tires still would leak with it or without it. That has been my experiance. Kinda more of a novalty. It did work great in bicycle tires though. And also in the wheels of our appliance dollys. But bicycle tubes held the mess inside them and dolly wheels get replaced rim and all so cheap we never bothered dismounting them. My .02

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14 minutes ago, SlammedRanger said:

I personally have never had slime do anything for me but cause a headache when dismounting tires. I did use it years ago and the tires still would leak with it or without it. That has been my experience. My .02

 

Would say a few things for Slime...

 

New stuff is way different. If this was long enough ago it was a totally different product.

Which product you use is really important. The blue label is the only one that works in low-speed tires.

If you know it is in the tire you can just break the bead and wash it out with water hose. No biggie really anymore.

Tell a tire guy in advance and then when the job is done give them some cash for lunch and their time. I promise they wont mind lol


My bet would be that your tires were either just gone, it was the old stuff or the application didn't take for whatever reason. Maybe not enough. 

It takes ~12-16 pumps per atv tire from the big pump bottle (or something like that) 

 

I can not express to you how much money in tires Slime has saved in the past few years. It is kinda pricy when you use it on ATV tires because you need so much.

Some dry cracked trailer tires, my scooter, the car, wheel barrow, tillers, tons of atv tires and more have worked well for me. I won't hesitate to use a different solution if a better one comes along though.

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18 hours ago, SlammedRanger said:

I personally have never had slime do anything for me but cause a headache when dismounting tires. I did use it years ago and the tires still would leak with it or without it.

 

its been kinda of the same with that tire on the rear of the 97, no dry cracks .... slime does slow the leek, but has never stopped it, as  a matter of fact there are several punctures 6 plus ... more like the PO backed over a board with nails .. or caught a bodark tree limb just right ... I'm not against plugging .... but figured I'd give slime a shot.... and none of the holes were stopped from leaking air .. all the way .. plus the fact if you park (which i did) with the punctures on the upside side ... you could see the slime oozing out ... with only low pressure in the tire ... so IMO it's a quick fix at best .... with slammed's idea .... looks like a better way to me ... 

 

20 hours ago, SlammedRanger said:

i cant see how you could go wrong. Aside from maybe doing it way up north in the middle of winter. As it is obveously water based and will freeze no doubt. But do it in the summer and you wont need to do it again in the cold. Like i said there wont be any liquid left when the gap is found and sealed.

 

and there goes the issue of freezing like slime WILL do... fact. 

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I've used slime with great results as well.  And to answer @shadetree's question, your greased rims kinda worked.

 

Right rear is good to go.  Left rear still leaked down, albeit more slowly.  I've slimed that one, and will give it a couple of days and make sure it's good to go.

 

 

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Some dry cracked trailer tires, my scooter, the car,

 

It is in basically every low-speed tire on my property lol

 

 

i wouldn't exactly call car tires low speed... buts that me .... 

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4 minutes ago, _Wilson_™ said:

i wouldn't exactly call car tires low speed... buts that me .... 

 

On 10/4/2020 at 9:34 AM, oh400ex said:

Which product you use is really important. The blue label is the only one that works in low-speed tires.

 

The answer is in the post you quoted from. Use the correct product for the application. 

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1 hour ago, jeepwm69 said:

I've used slime with great results as well.  And to answer @shadetree's question, your greased rims kinda worked.

 

Right rear is good to go.  Left rear still leaked down, albeit more slowly.  I've slimed that one, and will give it a couple of days and make sure it's good to go.

 

 

if it's leaking around the rim bead, very well could be a dent in the rim ?. or rust build up ?, or just leaking through dry rot cracks in the tires sidewall ?. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, oh400ex said:

 

 

 

The answer is in the post you quoted from. Use the correct product for the application. 

 

well be that as it may... i have worked in a tire shop before and those who use this ... for high rpm car truck tires always had issues getting there tires balanced just right when it balls up.... that's my take on it.... where as stay-flo would not  IMO .... you don't always go by the book .. lol, but rather 1st hand experience..... just my 02 .. 

Edited by _Wilson_™

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Posted (edited)
On 10/5/2020 at 12:04 PM, jeepwm69 said:

I've used slime with great results as well.  And to answer @shadetree's question, your greased rims kinda worked.

 

Right rear is good to go.  Left rear still leaked down, albeit more slowly.  I've slimed that one, and will give it a couple of days and make sure it's good to go.

 

 

add some course black peeper to the mix. 🙂

what about using permatex on some smaller tires? it could work.

Edited by LedFTed
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