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oh400ex

Field Fixes

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Hello everyone!

 

I wanted to share a trick with you that may someday get your bike home!

 

Not sure exactly why but it puts a huge smile on my face to see a machine break down and then be driven out successfully only because of skill, knowledge and preparation!

 

To preface,

I know this is not a permanent/correct fix and is only meant as a temporary measure to drive back home for repairs.

 

Super glue and baking soda.

 

Yep, I know it's old hat for a lot of you but it has gotten me out of a jam before and became useful again recently.

 

The idea is to fix a crack in gas tank (etc). You use the super glue as your substrate and baking soda as a hardener.

 

I start by roughing the area with sandpaper (or in the field a rock) cleaning with 91 Alcohol and allowing to dry fully. 

Then you apply the glue in a ring around the damage and sprinkle baking soda into the glue. This will instantly harden the glue and become very hot. Blow away any reside and repeat until the damaged area is sealed. 

 

I don't know how long this will hold gas but I know it can be at least a week.

 

I am currently running a little experiment and will share my results as I go. 

 

Thank you for reading!

oh400ex

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Edited by oh400ex
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Here is a picture of my tank from the XR after the fix. Great for testing the bike out before throwing down money on a new tank and easier than fitting a temporary replacement.

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I am of the old school, Seal All and a bit of my jeans, have had great luck with this method. 

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39 minutes ago, CamKnouff said:

I am of the old school, Seal All and a bit of my jeans, have had great luck with this method. 

 

Love it!

 

91% and super glue are always in my first aid kit. 91 alcohol is great for cleaning a wound and super glue to close it up.

 

If it gets you home 😄

 

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Just an update for y'all...

 

They oil jug is still holding gas after a week and sat in the sun for two days. The patch on the bike is also not leaking.

 

This (CA glue / baking soda) should be considered a temporary solution but it is WAY better than I thought it would be.

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Two more weeks of sitting in the sun and still no leaks. Squeezed the bottle to attempt to make it fail and it still held.

 

Will update again when it fails but after holding for weeks... I'd say that's test successful. Never meant to be a permanent fix.

 

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Good to know- have used superglue and baking soda on small fill type cracks on fiberglass panels on motorcycles, snowmobile cowlings etc

lnterested to know it holds up to fuel, I have baking soda and super glue at camp

 

I keep a tube of SteelStik by jb weld in my tool box of atv, never tried in on fuel though

It sets up in 20 mins or less and is very solid when done right- used it to plug a radiator leak miles from camp one time

cleaned area, mixed putty, put it on, walked a 30 minute circle and got a grouse and a squirrel and headed back

the epoxy was rock hard so i topped off the radiator with stream water and tested it out and it worked for the next week at camp

it was a fracture at lower radiator neck where hose connects, ordered used one off ebay later on but kept some Steelstik around ever since

 

I remember on the old original JB Weld package  used to have little quotes and stuff on it-"repaired my cracked tractor engine block" "still working 10 years later" etc...

I always liked reading those and hearing other stories about getting out of a pinch some way or another

I heard a tale of Native Alaskan who made a spark plug out of wood and wire for a skidoo and made it back -seems impossible and in WINTER -who knows?

Also one where they made a drive gear for the chaincase on a skidoo out of a couple of trap pans and a file- again just enough to make it back but it worked

Could be tongue in cheek, who know?-fun to think about....

 

Would like to hear your best field fix -JB weld/ baling wire story

 

 

Edited by AKATV
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Using JBWeld one that comes to mind.  I broke the pivot ball for the clutch linkage off the bell housing of my truck.  I used 5 packs of JBWeld and some window screen and repaired it. I found a new bell housing and never did change it 

 

I have been buying MinuteMend instead of JB.  I like it better.  It is like a tootsie roll with a center filling  and you kneed the Stuff together. With you fingers.

 

the window screen works well , you put some putty down then you put the screen on top and put another layer on top of the screen and it gives it strength

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Wow- 5 packs of JB Weld! thats a solid repair for sure ☺️

I think the Steelstick I am using by JB Weld is the same thing- its a grey putty stick that comes in a tube with a black center filling

you just cut it off a piece and knead it until its a uniform grey color- then stick it where you need it

It sets up rock solid in about 10-20 minutes depending on temperature it gets warm to the touch while setting up

It worked pretty well for me so far

That window screen is a great idea too- kind of like when they put rebar in cement for strength

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1 hour ago, AKATV said:

Would like to hear your best field fix -JB weld/ baling wire story

 

Suzuki LT80

 

The swing-arm is part of the engine case on this bike and if someone too heavy (adult) rides it... you will crack the case.

 

We repaired a crack that was the length of the case with JB original and mesh screen. Took the die grinder to the crack and gave the JB a fighting chance.

Because it was under strain, we were not expecting it to hold but figured it was worth a shot. Only kids were allowed on it and no jumping but it lasted years after that.

 

The picture is not mine but shows a case that has been welded. The crack in this case was like ours and something you would never think JB could handle.

I don't remember how many tubes but way too many... could have paid for it to be TIG welded for what we spent in JB most likely.

 

JB Original with support is incredibly strong and will definitely surprise you with how much it can do. Prep is the most important bit by a mile. Fish described the screen reinforcement perfectly. I would add to press the JB into the surface as hard as you can to encourage bond.


I have saved thousands of dollars of machinery from being retired with a little JB. Replacing the part is better but I always keep some on hand!

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