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WonderMonkey

Snowmobile Type Boots Recommendation

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I need some boots that are warm for non to little activity in cold weather.  I have boots that work very well when I'm moving or working but when I'm sitting or standing for an extended time my toes get very cold.  Both of my feet have had a touch of frostbite from an error on my part, so that makes them more prone to the cold.

 

I don't need it for North Canada or North Alaska (where I've been), but more like down to -20 F or even -30 F.  I like the snowmobile type boot as many of them are taller and have the collar that you can tighten to keep snow out.  I'll wear them when riding in places like Michigan, Wisconsin, and even parts of Canada.  NORMALLY the temps will be down to at most about -10 F but I'd like to extend to the colder temps to make sure I have it covered.

 

Baffin makes some boots that are rated to -100ºC/-148ºF but in reality we know that's the extreme low.  They also make some boots that are rated to -70ºC/-94ºF.  While I want my feet to stay warm, I also don't want to break out into a sweat if I'm just doing the normal walking that comes with getting to and setting up camp.  In my head, I've settled in on the -94 F range (for this brand) but I'd love input on this.

 

Just for an example on these, I'm not sold on them.

https://www.baffin.com/collections/shop-all-mens-activity/products/40000048

https://www.baffin.com/collections/mens-extreme-cold/products/epicm005

 

 

Because of how I'll use them, I figured boots made for snowmobiling will work just fine.  I won't be out chopping wood in these as again, these are for fun, and I have boots for working outside.

 

I know several people here exist in these climates way more than I have or do.  Sure, I spent a Winter near Fairbanks, Alaska but that was wearing military bunny boots, and those don't go high enough for my purposes.

 

Thanks for your time.

Edited by WonderMonkey

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I am no cold expert by a loooooooong shot , but do read a lot , recently learned about fox fur socks , material is not really fox fur , it is made to be like fox fur , that say that is the stuff >>>> look it up 

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15 minutes ago, Fishfiles said:

I am no cold expert by a loooooooong shot , but do read a lot , recently learned about fox fur socks , material is not really fox fur , it is made to be like fox fur , that say that is the stuff >>>> look it up 

 

I will certainly look it up.  The proper socks and other base layer are a very important part of this.  On my normal boots, I wear tall gaiters to lessen any wind from heat stealing and to keep snow from going down the top.  If needed, I'll use gaiters again.

 

But the socks.  Thanks, and I'll look those up.

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CKX are the ones we all have around here. Very light & warm.

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I have a pair of Lacrosse Arrow Head (7mm) that I use for riding or light work. The are comfortable and keep my feet warm when not being very active (sitting on the wheeler). They are too much for when I'm cutting wood but light work they still do good.

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3 minutes ago, toodeep said:

I have a pair of Lacrosse Arrow Head (7mm) that I use for riding or light work. The are comfortable and keep my feet warm when not being very active (sitting on the wheeler). They are too much for when I'm cutting wood but light work they still do good.

 

Thanks, I'll look those up.

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I've learned to spray my bare feet with anti perspirant and using 100% cotton socks before going out.  There's a pair 5 buckle arctics with a felt liner maybe 3/8" thick? and studs for ice on the bottom that I forgot to give back when I retired.  They are extremely warm but at a cost of being very large and cumbersome.  Also difficult to put on and take off unless you slip a Walmart bag over your boots first.

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1 hour ago, 56Sierra said:

I've learned to spray my bare feet with anti perspirant and using 100% cotton socks before going out.  There's a pair 5 buckle arctics with a felt liner maybe 3/8" thick? and studs for ice on the bottom that I forgot to give back when I retired.  They are extremely warm but at a cost of being very large and cumbersome.  Also difficult to put on and take off unless you slip a Walmart bag over your boots first.

 

Those sound quite substantial!  Do you know what brand and model they are?  They may be a bit too cumbersome but I'd like to take a look and see, maybe they have a model a step down.

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1 hour ago, 56Sierra said:

I've learned to spray my bare feet with anti perspirant and using 100% cotton socks before going out.

 

been ther before ... and that does work, works really good, helps keep the foot dry, when the temp inside the boot climbs, as for the sack trick, that's a new one (on the outside) but i have seen people use a heavy ziplock bag over the foot then put the boot / shoe on to help when the shoe / boot  develops a leak, kind of like patching a tire on the rush. lol! 

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Shrimping and fishing in the cold winter , I use to put bread bags or those cheap plastic bags they give you at  the grocery store over my socks before putting my foot in the boot  and it helped 

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I've done that with converse sneakers when i was out on the farm, you never  could tell what the weather, or next job would have in store, and those brand sneakers have always been my favorite comfortable shoe, besides Justin boots. 

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Big mistake on the 5 buckles.   They do not have a removable felt liner as I remembered.   These do have a furry insides to them.  These are Lacrosse 00367190  Tracktion boots for use on ice.

A size 10 overshoe measures 5" wide, 13.5 long and 11 high.

Picture beside my 10.5 Redwings.

20210225_082420.jpg

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1 hour ago, Fishfiles said:

Shrimping and fishing in the cold winter , I use to put bread bags or those cheap plastic bags they give you at  the grocery store over my socks before putting my foot in the boot  and it helped 

 

I used to do this when I was younger and we couldn't afford boots.  I do recall there was no "wicking of sweat" away from the feet, though.  On your shrimping and fishing job I could see how using the bags would keep you dry, even considering the potential sweat moisture.

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1 hour ago, 56Sierra said:

Big mistake on the 5 buckles.   They do not have a removable felt liner as I remembered.   These do have a furry insides to them.  These are Lacrosse 00367190  Tracktion boots for use on ice.

A size 10 overshoe measures 5" wide, 13.5 long and 11 high.

Picture beside my 10.5 Redwings.

 

 

Thanks.  Even without the removable liner I'll still look into them.  I certainly have some time before a purchase and want to cover everything.

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Mine have ice spikes on the bottom.  Yes, great on ice but deadly on a polished concrete garage floor. 

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15 minutes ago, WonderMonkey said:

154563112_10166773692835206_7051638769399576158_n.jpg

Got your name all over that >>>> Wonder

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46 minutes ago, Fishfiles said:

Got your name all over that >>>> Wonder

 

Yes!  I should sue them for trademark or something.

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Working in houses with no windows or doors through this last polar vortex i found socks that kept my feet warm and toasty but never sweaty or smelly. They are called wigwam. They are made of marino wool. And there was atleast 2 days i was trudging through a foot or two of snow all day and they were soaked on the outside but my feet were still dry and warm on the inside. Hands down the best purchase i made. I have no doubt my feet would have been frost bit otherwise. The few days leading up to getting them my feet hurt like they were on fire for about 3 hours after work. My understanding is this was the beginning stages of frost bit. I just wear normal composite toe work boots.

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26 minutes ago, SlammedRanger said:

Working in houses with no windows or doors through this last polar vortex i found socks that kept my feet warm and toasty but never sweaty or smelly. They are called wigwam. They are made of marino wool. And there was atleast 2 days i was trudging through a foot or two of snow all day and they were soaked on the outside but my feet were still dry and warm on the inside. Hands down the best purchase i made. I have no doubt my feet would have been frost bit otherwise. The few days leading up to getting them my feet hurt like they were on fire for about 3 hours after work. My understanding is this was the beginning stages of frost bit. I just wear normal composite toe work boots.

 

Merino wool is a big deal.  I do have some synthetics also, but Merion wool make up some of my socks and the hat on my head.  I have other socks that I'm hoping will wear out so I can get MORE but they may have to have an "accident" to make room.

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I where only Merino wool from Smartwool or Fits. Way warmer than cotton socks. Have a pair of Cabela's Trans Alaska lll's for when it's really cold. Have rode snowmobiles and stood on the ice all day in -25F without getting cold. Have Goretex in them too so they are waterproof. 

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11 minutes ago, PROV said:

I where only Merino wool from Smartwool or Fits. Way warmer than cotton socks. Have a pair of Cabela's Trans Alaska lll's for when it's really cold. Have rode snowmobiles and stood on the ice all day in -25F without getting cold. Have Goretex in them too so they are waterproof. 

 

I have some Smartwool, never used Fits so I'll look that up.  For really cold weather (relative), where my problem exists, I'll look of the Cabela's Trans Alaska III's.

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I've JUST about settled on Baffin's Icebreaker boots, but I'm not locked in.  They are the frontrunner but I'm still adding and taking away from the list.  Since my part of Ohio isn't normally very cold, the stores around here don't stock this layer of boot.  Because this is an important thing for me, I'm willing to drive North a bit if I can try on all my frontrunners and make a choice.

 

Socks, as several are chiming in about, are key to this strategy, of course.

 

One thing I do, which helps, is wear a pair of below the knee gaiters.  They keep the normal wet and wind away from the part of the boots (legs) that they cover, and really help.  I plan to to get a larger pair so they cover my cold weather bottoms.  To date the size I have just covers if I'm wearing hiking pants, but not a thicker suit.

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